Pathfinder
Adventures
Nov 17
Posted by Mark at 16:28

Asmodee Games has been making its name porting board games to the digital format, and one of their more recent is an adaptation of the RPG card game Pathfinder.

You start by selecting a handful of characters and building decks for them given certain restrictions. Then, after a short visual novel-style cutscene, you drop each of them into one of a choice of locations. Each of these locations has their own deck of cards, featuring a mix of monsters to defeat, weapons to collect and allies to recruit- and one location's will contain the Big Bad for this scenario.

Each turn you pick the top card from the location's deck, and then you react to it by rolling dice and picking cards from your Hand to make your dice rolls more likely to succeed.

Hands tend to be in the region of five or six cards and represent both your toolset and your health. Weapons, by example, allow you to add an extra die to your combat roll- if you roll a number higher than that on the card you drew from the Location deck, you defeat the monster, and if it's lower, you take damage to the value of the difference between the dice roll and the card. Or, in other words, discard that number of cards from your hand.

At the end of each turn you draw cards from your Deck to fill your hand and if you cannot hold a full hand you die, this means you die with cards left which can feel unfair, especially if one of your characters has a larger hand, which can make up about a third of the deck.

Play cycles through each of the characters in turn until the location they're in can be 'closed', either by working all the way through the location deck or fulfilling some other criteria specific to that place.

If you encounter the Big Bad, it is fought in the same way as all the other monsters- although when defeated, it will attempt to run away. If it is encountered prematurely, locations can also be temporarily closed if a character is already there at the time- this means it they can only escape to open locations, giving you an idea of where it's hiding.

This, coupled with the 'Blessings' deck, which acts as a de facto time limit, adds elements of strategy to your character and location choices- fewer characters mean that you can focus and use time more efficiently, but more means you're better able to corner the Big Bad sooner.

There is a lot you can do with your deck to improve your chances, with more powerful cards having more powerful effects and more tweaks that help to mitigate the fiddlier effects of the enemies you will face, although it's this stage where the game starts to fall apart.

The PC version of Pathfinder Adventures is, if you like, an adaptation of an adaptation- the game swapped cardboard for pixels once already, being released on mobile before being ported to Windows. The mobile version is Free-To-Play, while the PC version is a paid game, with paid DLC expansions.

While the microtransactions are happily left behind, there has been no meaningful change to the gameplay in transit- outside of the campaign scenarios, Pathfinder Adventures is very much a currency-based affair, which means grinding and loot boxes.

Playing through a normal scenario will see your deck both gain and lose cards, and the end of each scenario will see you having to rebalance your deck, removing cards of a type which you have too many of, and replacing cards lost of types that you have too few of. You draw these from a 'stash' of cards, shared between your characters- although this itself comes with limitations. The stash can only hold twenty cards, and all the rest must be thrown away and exchanged for currency- as such it's difficult to build a decent selection of cards, limiting the scope for experimentation.

The game is decidedly stingy when it comes to handing out currency, and even though cards which fall out of the loot box go into a seperate stash which doesn't need to be regularly emptied, once they're in your deck they're up to be lost, something that can really start to grate when the dice decide that they're not on your side.

There are also other problems that have arisen from the conversion from one platform to the other, notably that we had trouble getting the game to run at a decent frame rate on a few PCs unless the resolution and a lot of the graphical effects were turned down, and some aspects of the touch-based UI translate badly to mouse control- something that is pleasingly tactile on mobile becomes admin with a mouse.

There's a solid game at the base of this, but it's perhaps not entirely compatible with videogame business models, at least not without serious rebalancing. The paper version might well be a better choice.
0 comments / permalink

PreviousNext
PC Review
The Norwood Suite

Related Articles
Batman Arkham Knight Post Patch Test
By Ben 2015-09-08 05:57:25 0 comments

Like a great many people I bought Batman Arkham Knight on pc at launch. I wasn't quite climbing the walls waiting for it, I really like the Batman games but after Arkham Asylum, City, Cit...
Read more...
Treasure try their luck on Steam Greenlight with Ikaruga
By Mark 2013-10-07 23:20:35 0 comments

Stream Greenlight was founded as a way for Valve- gatekeepers of the Steam digital distribution service- to manage all those submissions from little tinpot one-man-show indie developer no...
Read more...
In Between Gameplay Video
By Ben 2015-09-04 14:29:39 0 comments

We take a look at In Between, an indie puzzle platformer type thing which uses gravity mechanics as a means to getting to the end of the level
Read more...